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Posts Tagged ‘SAP’

Migrating BEx-based Information Spaces to BusinessObjects 4.0

August 8th, 2013 3 comments

Sometimes in software it can feel that you take two steps forward and one step back.

One example of this is with BEx-based Explorer Information Spaces when migrating from XI 3.1 to BO 4.0. In 4.0, SAP removed the ability to create information spaces against the legacy universe (unv) and instead required everyone to use the new universe format (unx).

On the surface this lack of support for the legacy universe didn’t seem to really be a problem because BusinessObjects 4.0 provides a painless way to migrate universes from the legacy unv to unx format.

What I didn’t realize initially until a few months ago was that this WAS be a big problem.  A big problem for customers who were creating Information Spaces based on BEx queries and Infocubes.

I’d like to share with you my journey to understand what is really required to move my Bex-based Information Spaces to BusinessObjects v4.0.

Explorer, BEx and Unx

Explorer is NOT an OLAP-aware product, therefore is doesn’t understand hierarchies, so in XI 3.1 the unv would flatten the hierarchies for you can generate a flattened hierarchy as L00, L01, L02, L03, etc. There are some advantages to this approach, but there are obvious drawbacks as well.

With BusinessObjects v4.0, SAP rolled out the idea of a transient universe, such that if you wanted to create a WebIntelligence report you didn’t have to create a universe first. WebIntelligence would create a universe on the fly and a hierarchy is treated as a single column with the ability to use +/- to expand and collapse. (You can read more about WebIntelligence and BICS connectivity here.)

If  you try and convert an XI 3.1 universe based on a BEx query to a unx, it gives you the following error:

Now What?

The only 2 options I came up with to overcome this challenge were:

  • Use WebIntelligence (unv) to generate an Excel file and have Explorer index the xls file.
  • Leverage a Multi-Source relational connection to  connect to the the BEx cube and hierarchy relationally

Approach 1 – Excel Output

The approach I took here was to use the legacy unv file to create a WebI report.  I would then schedule this WebI report and generate an Excel file.  The Excel file would overwrite to ‘source’ Excel file of the Information Space.

To set this up, I created the WebI report with no header and a table that starts at position (0,0).  This table will easily export to Excel.

Sample WebI output prepped for Excel

Next, export the results to Excel 2007 format (xlsx)

Resulting WebI output in Excel

I then uploaded the xls file the BI Launchpad and used it as a source for my Information Space.

 

Once Explorer was able to generate the information space the way I wanted it, I was read to schedule the WebIntelligence report to Excel output.

Information Space based off an Excel file

Now, look at the properties of the Excel file, because we will need this when scheduling our WebIntelligence report.

Find the FRS location of the Excel File

I can now schedule WebIntelligence to run on a schedule and since I know the physical location of the Excel file in the FRS.

In my case the directory is: D:\Program Files (x86)\SAP BusinessObjects\SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 4.0\FileStore\Input\a_053\035\001\74549\   and the file name is:  work order excel-guid[e93a2669-0847-4cd2-b87d-390beb1c956c1].xlsx.

I can use that file name in the WebIntelligence scheduler and write over the source xlsx file for my information space.

When scheduling the file make sure and select the following:

  • Recurrence – chose the frequency that makes sense for you.
  • Formats – chose Excel.   (The default is always WebI.)
  • Destinations – chose File System.  Do NOT keep an instance in the history.  Use the xlsx directory and filename.

Select the correct parameters in the recurring schedule

As a last step, I would then schedule Explorer to reindex the Information Space after the file was changed and all will be good.

Scheduling Indexing for Explorer

Now the information space should be generated and everything should work just fine.

I must say that at first I really struggled to get this technique to work.  I’m not sure if my WebI output file was too large or if there was some other type of problem.  I spent hours (and hours and hours) trying to troubleshoot why this wasn’t working.  After speaking with technical support and having them attempt the same process, we thought that there was some type of incompatibility between the Excel files generated by WebIntelligence and the Excel format required by the Information Space for indexing.

There were a couple of different errors I encountered.  A few times I forgot to specify Excel as the output type so I got this error:

The only way I was able to fix the error was to restart my Explorer services and reschedule the WebI report and make sure it was exporting in Excel format.

Another error I got was when I didn’t properly exit the information space before attempting to reindex it.  In that case I would get an indexing error and see this when opened up the information space through “Manage Spaces”.

I found that this method of solving the issues was somewhat flaky.  Sometimes I found that after WebIntelligence overwrote the Excel file, Explorer is not longer able to index it.  It’ was very frustrating and technical support was only able to provide limited support because this is not the recommended solution for the problem.

So what did SAP recommend?  They suggested a much less elegant but more robust and fully supported approach — a multi-source universe.

Approach 2 – Multi-source Solution

This solution is less straightforward, but I was able to get it working and SAP says that this is the only solution that’s officially supported.

There are three things we need to do:

  1. Generate the flattened hierarchy lists and load them into another database (e.g. SQL Server)
  2. Read the SAP Note 1656905 about creating a unx universe from a BW Infocube
  3. Link the two systems via a multi-source connection

In order to generate the flattened hierarchy, you must use the legacy unv universe against your Infocube.  The ability to flatten a hierarchy is not available in a unx universe.  (SAP says that BICS is not there to flatten the hierarchy and there are no plans to enable it because then it’s no longer a hierarchy.  Bummer.)

Next, create a WebIntelligence report based on a legacy unv universe.  Add all levels of the hierarchy to the report and run the report.  Once you have the report, export the results to an Excel file and load them into a relational database.

I created a table called: tblPCHier

Flattened BW Hiearchy in SQL Server

Next, I imported the Excel output into my new database table:

BW Hierarchy is loaded in SQL Server

Note:  You need to watch out for accidental duplicate names a lower levels of the hierarchy.  Because WebIntelligence will automatically try and aggregate multiple values, you need to be aware that if the child nodes have the same name but a different parent value, the child nodes will roll up and display and aggregated value within Explorer.  If this is not what you want, then you will want to make sure that the child node names are unique.

Next we are ready to go into the IDT (Information Design Tool) and create our multi-source universe.  Follow the instructions listed in the SAP Note 1656905 to understand how to create a unx on top of a BW Infocube.

Once our BW star schema has been added to our data foundation, we can add another connection to our other datasource, the relational database, so we can bring in our hierarchy.

Lastly, join the column from the BEx fact table (SAP) to the key of my hierarchy table (SQL Server).

When our multi-source universe is complete we should see a connection to SAP, a connection to a relational database, a data foundation and a universe.

Completed unx components

Here is a preview of my hierarchy table from within the IDT:

View of flattened Hierarchy

So now we just need to verify that everything we need is in the universe.  The big challenge being that not everything from BEx is available in a unx.  Here are some of the things we lose when we go to a relational universe:

  • Calculated Key Figures
  • Restricted Key Figures
  • Variables
  • Conditions
  • Unit / Currency Conversion
  • Hierarchies (which we know about)
  • Custom Structures
  • Time Dependent Objects

I suggest you commit this list to memory.

In one case I had over 50 calculated key figures that I needed to map into Explorer and therefore recreating the logic in SQL was difficult and tedious.

In that case I had measures that included some time dependent calculations:

  • Total AR
  • Current AR, Over 30 days, Over 60 days, Over 90 days, Over 120 days
  • Current Debit, Debit over 30, Debit over 60,  Debit over 90,  Debit over 120
  • Current Credit, Credit over 30, Credit over 60 and Credit over 120

In BEx, I had implemented exit variables to do dynamic time calculations.  Now I need to do the same thing for Explorer.

To accomplish this, I built SQL Server Views which dynamically calculated values such as Last Day Previous Month and Last Day Previous Month Previous Year.  I could then use these dynamic calculates in my universe.

Equivalent userexit logic in SQL Server

Although I included these views in the data model, I did not need to join them to anything.

These views were simply used to dynamically generate a date value which was used to restrict the queries to the correct data elements.

Here is a look at the measures that were created in the universe (click on the image to enlarge):

Measures within the Universe

Here is a screenshot of the WHERE logic for “Total AR, Last Month”:

WHERE Logic for restricted key figure

Here is some of the logic spelled out.

WHERE logic for “Total AR” that leverages curDate()

@Select (ZFIAR_C01\Clearing/Reverse/Posting Dates\Posting date in the document) <= curDate()
OR
(Select (ZFIAR_C01\Clearing/Reverse/Posting Dates\Clearing date) > curDate()
OR
Select (ZFIAR_C01\Clearing/Reverse/Posting Dates\Clearing date) < {d ‘1900-01-01’}
)

WHERE logic for “Total AR, Last Month” that leveages Last Day Prev Month view

@Select (ZFIAR_C01\Clearing/Reverse/Posting Dates\Posting date in the document) <= @Select(SQL\V Last Day Prev Month\Last Day Prev Month)
OR
(Select (ZFIAR_C01\Clearing/Reverse/Posting Dates\Clearing date) <= @Select(SQL\V Last Day Prev Month\Last Day Prev Month)
OR
Select (ZFIAR_C01\Clearing/Reverse/Posting Dates\Clearing date) < {d ‘1900-01-01’}
)

If you have to do a lot of this type of time-based calculation logic, you might also want to review some of my previous blogs on the topic.  You don’t necessarily have to create views in the database to do the time calculations:
http://trustedbi.com/2009/12/29/timeseries1/
http://trustedbi.com/2010/01/06/timeseries2/
http://trustedbi.com/2010/01/18/timeseries3/

Cavet

This method of implementation is not for the faint hearted.  I can potentially mean a lot of work.

I would like to highlight some important considerations:

  • If your hierarchies are change on a regular basis, you will need to automate the updating of the SQL Server table which contains the hierarchy.
  • If you have a lot of calculated key figure which will need to be recreated within SQL.
  • Any logic you built into variables or user exits may need to be recreated within SQL.

Given these constraints it’s hard for me to endorse converting all your Explorer information spaces to BusinessObjects v4.0 without first understanding the complexity of your Infocubes. The good news is that SAP BusinessObjects v4.1 will overcome these limitations.

Try the Excel method first.  It’s worth a shot.

 BusinessObjects v4.1 to the Rescue

Recently in a What’s New in Explorer 4.1  ASUG call, SAP announced that in BusinessObjects 4.1, unv files will be supported.  This is great news.  Of course that begs the question.  If unx is the way forward, how will we flatten our SAP hierarchies in the future?

SAP BusinessObjects 4.1 is currently in ramp-up and the latest information on Service Marketplace says that it is targeted to exit ramp-up on November 10, 2013.  As always, this date is subject to change.

On additional piece of advice, if you are curious to learn about future releases and maintenance schedules, I suggest you check out this site on Service Marketplace: https://websmp108.sap-ag.de/bosap-maintenance-schedule Although these days are only planned dates, they are useful to have when planning system maintenance and upgrades.

Hope you’ve found this helpful.

«Good BI»

Categories: Lumira Tags: , , ,

Merging SAP and non-SAP data: Overcoming Hierarchies

May 29th, 2012 12 comments

Even though SAP provides connectivity to both SAP BW and relational data, combining these data sets into a single report can be tricky.  There are lots of ways to do it:

  1. A Single, Federated Query combining an SAP DSO and Relational data at the universe tier.
  2. A Single, Federated Query combining an SAP Infocube Relational Schema + Relational data at the universe tier.
  3. Two non-Federated Queries, one BW Query and one Universe query, merging the data at the report (WebI) tier.

The first method has long been supported but you loose all the value-added elements of the Infocube.  Most customer I work with want to connect to the BEx Queries that run against the Infocubes.

The second method is supported, but not recommended.  The semantic layer via the federation engine is able to interrogate the Infoprovider and expose it as a relational star schema.  Here are a list of some of the elements you lose:

  • BW Hierarchies
  • Restricted and Calculated Key Figures
  • BEx Queries
  • BW Variables
  • Currency & Unit Conversion
  • Exceptions, Conditions

>> I always use the third approach, but there’s one big problem.  Hierarchies have remained a huge challenge.  Until Now.

SAP Hierarchies

Many customers have SAP Hierarchies that they have developed that they want to combine with non-SAP data.  The problem is that when you merge the data at the report level, the roll-ups no longer work.  Today I’ve discovered that there is a “secret formula” that solves this issue and I think you’ll like what you see.

Step by Step

Let me walk you through an example step-by-step.

The first thing I have to do is create an Infocube with a hierarchy and create a BEx Query on top of the InfoCube.  In my case I have a characteristic called District, which contains a hierarchy called, Regional.  In my example the hierarchy is a simple, two level hierarchy.

Infocube 2-level Hierarchy

I then created a BEx Query for that leverages this hierarchy.

BEx Query which references a hierarchy

Next I created an OLAP connection within the CMC to the associated BEx Query.

Create OLAP Connection in the CMC

Once the connection to the SAP data is complete, I created a data set in SQL Server which matches all the base level members.  Here is a view of the data:

View of SQL Server data which matches my SAP data

I then created and published a universe that connects to the SQL Server data and returns the correct results.

Universe Connecting to Data in SQL Server

Now it’s time to create a WebIntelligence Report.  First I’m going to connect to the BEx Query and pull in Regional (Hierarchy) as well as the measures Actual Amount and Budgeted Amount.

Next, I accessed the Data Access > Data Providers > New data provider and selected Universe.  This allowed me to connect to the SQL Server universe and added the elements from SQL Server and run the second query.

Query Panel Connecting To SQL Server (non-SAP) data

Now I had all the data I need from the two queries.  One query is pulling data from BW with a hierarchy and the other query is pulling data from SQL Server.  Here is what the data providers looked like once both queries have been added to the report:

The Available Objects from Query 1 & Query 2

Now I simply needed to merge the two data elements Regional together.  All you have to do is highlight to two values and choose Data Access > Data Objects > Merge.

From here select the Regional objects.

Merge Regional Objects

Once that was done, the key figures from the SAP and Relational data can be combined together is the same table and this is what the results look like when put into a table.  The first 3 columns come from SAP and the last two columns come from SQL Server:

Data Is Merged But Calculations Do Not Roll Up

You see that the elements all match and appear together at the lowest level, but the parent values are not rolling up.  This is because WebI is also looking for the values Metropolitan and Rural in the dataset.  If I was not doing simple addition, I would have no choice but to add these into the original data in SQL Server.  In my case I am doing a simple roll-up SUM(), therefore I can fix this with a new formula!

Magic Formula

Here is the magic formula:

=If( [].[].IsLeaf =1 )
Then [<relational_measure_name>]
Else Sum( [<relational_measure_name>] ; Descendants([<olap_webi_query_name>].[<olap_hierarchy_name>];1;Self_After) )

I say “magic” because when I first saw this formula, I was blown away.  Now that WebIntelligence contains a number of native OLAP functions, these types of OLAP-centric calculations are possible.

Leverage This New Formula

In my case I had two key figures which were coming from SQL Server, so these values would need to be replaced with formulas that included this new OLAP roll-up math.

I created a formula for the Citc Credits first:

New Citc OLAP Formula

I did the same for Turbine Totals and ended up with the following Available Objects.  You can see my two new Variables: Citc Credit Totals and Turbines Total.

Available Objects with New Variables for OLAP Rollups

Once I replaced the SQL Server key figures with the new OLAP formulas, I was able to see the magic in action.

WebI Report With Correct Hierarchical Rollups

 Conclusion

It’s not perfect but it works… and it works very well.  Ideally it would be best if we could merge the data at the semantic layer so that for each report the user didn’t have to have to create a series of formulas to solve this problem… however until a better semantic layer solution exists that supports hierarchies like this, I’m going to be a big fan of this new workaround.

«Good BI»

 

 

SAP Runs Crystal Reports

December 15th, 2011 8 comments

Say it loud, Say it proud

With the latest development of SAP Business Suite Enhancement Pak 5, SAP users can now enjoy the rich, flexible formatting functionality right from within the application.

ALVs Get An Upgrade

For many years, users have been limited in their ability to provide formatted reporting from an SAP ALV (ABAP List Viewer).  Users could do basic sorting, grouping and filter, but that was about it.  Now the output from an ALV can be pushed directly into a Crystal Report using the new Crystal Reports ALV Adapter.

This solution is currently available for ALV Grid (SAP GUI ALV) and for Web Dynpro ABAP ALV.  ALV List and ALV Classic are not supported.  In my case, I will be running an SAP GUI ALV.

Using the Crystal Reports ALV Adapter

Before installing the adapter you need to be running Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 or above.  In addition, because I will be running ALVs run directly within the SAP GUI, I must have also installed SAP GUI 7.10 or above.

Downloading the Adapter

One of the hardest things about installing the adapter is finding in the Service Marketplace. Here is a screenshot of the location

Personally, I recommend searching for it.  Here is how I found it:

From the search screen, search for CR ADD-ON

Software Search Screen

Search for CR ADD-ON

You should see CR ADD-ON FOR BS APPS 1.0 come back in the search results.  This is what you want.

Search Results

Once you select CR ADD-ON FOR BS APPS 1.0, you will be able to download the ZIP archive file.

Service Marketplace Software Download

After extracting the application you will see the xSAPCRVAdpt.exe, which is what we will be installing.

Installing the Adapter

Begin the installation by double-clicking on the install file, xSAPCRVAdpt.exe.

Here we will see the Crystal Reports ALV Adapter ready to be installed.

After choosing Next, the installation will begin:

After a few minutes you should see the following message, which indicates the installation was successful.

Configuring the Adapter

The final step after installing the adapter is telling Business Suite to allow Crystal Reports to be used with ALVs.

We need to use tcode, SALV_GUI_CUST

Here we want to make sure we Allow Crystal Reports to be an option.

Next we need to use tcode, SALV_WD_CUST to go into the Web Dynpro Settings

Here we want to make sure we Allow Crystal Reports to be an option.

Testing the Adapter

You can use any ALV Grid (SAP GUI ALV) or Web Dynpro ABAP ALV for testing.  In my case, I’m going to use the t-code KSB1, Display Actual Cost Line Items for Cost Centers.

Note that at the end of the input screen, I select the layout for this report.  This is important because with Enhancement Pak 5, you can save Layouts that leverage Crystal Reports.

Here are the default results in an ALV Grid:

Pretty boring, eh?

Choose the Change Layout Icon

Under the View tab you can change the Preferred View to Crystal Reports.  This will cause the data to be sent to a Crystal Report using the SAP_GenericTemplate.rpt.

Now you can see the output in a Crystal Report.

Modifying the Crystal Report

We first need to get a copy of the report, so we will chose the option “Export Report”.

Export to Crystal Report

By selecting this option, I will be presented with a dialog box which will allow me to Save the Report to my hard drive.  At first, I found this button confusing because I expected it to work like it does in standard Crystal Reports and ask me if I wanted to export the report in PDF.  It left me wondering how I would go about exporting the results to PDF if I wanted to.  Hmm.

NOTE:  Once the report is exported, you can make changes to it using
Crystal Reports 2011, since at the time of this writing Crystal Reports
for Enterprise does not support direct data connectivity.  Also this template
was created in the pre-Crystal Reports 9 format; therefore you could modify
these reports with older versions of Crystal Reports.

When you open the report to modify it, you will see that the data is being pushed into the report via an ADO.NET (XML) database connector.  This means that this report cannot be refreshed from within Crystal Reports during the report modification process.

Rather than showing you the details about how to modify a Crystal Report, I will simply assume that after exporting the report, you have been able to make a number of changes to suit your needs and are ready to load those changes into the SAP List Viewer.

Select your update report from the dialog box:

After after being imported successfully:

… the new report layout will appear on the screen

Saving the Layout for Future Use

Now that we’ve got the new report loaded, we would like choose this view or layout.  SAP accommodates this.  All you need to do is save the layout under a new name by following the prompts in the Save Layout dialog:

In my case I named my new report layout /ZCRKSB1

After the layout has been saved, users can reference it from the Setting section of the original SAP List Viewer prompt screen.  Under the last section, Settings the user can change the default layout by selecting the layout of their choice.

Summary

For many years now, we’ve been talking to customers and partners about the value of embedded analytics.  Now we are finally beginning to see they rolled out in earnest.  Not only is Crystal Reports now embedded directly into SAP Business Suite, but SAP Dashboards (aka Xcelsius) are being provided out of the box for HR, Finance and other key areas.

The only drawback of embedded analytics today is the lack of built-in intelligence about how to navigate the data.  In the SAP List Viewer today, if you click on a column, the List Viewer is intelligent enough to drill to the associated supporting document.  But even with this limitation, there is still real value in better reporting from SAP Business Suite.

«Good BI»

Forrester gives BusinessObjects top marks!

October 28th, 2010 No comments

I launched a tweet or two about the latest Forrester Report.  In case you haven’t read it, I quoted a few of the best nuggets.

The Leader of the Pack

SAP led the pack because of the completeness of not just BI,
but overall information management functionality.

I love that about BusinessObjects.  It’s the classic garbage in, garbage out.  It doesn’t matter how pretty your reports are, if the underlying data infrastructure in creaking under a poorly maintained data warehouse with hand-coded ETL logic and data quality problems.  Information Management is key!

SAP BusinessObjects continues to steamroll with innovative
products like Explorer and in-memory analytical appliance –
Business Warehouse Accelerator.  When you’re looking for the
top report writer, look no further than Crystal [Reports],
which is probably OEMed and embedded in more applications
than any other commercial BI tool.

Have you tried out Explorer yet?  You can try it for free on http://create.ondemand.com.  You can upload a spreadsheet and take it for a spin.  I’d be interested to hear what you think about it.

Xcelsius remains popular with many executives because
they can take the self-contained Flash files, which
combine dashboard application and data, on the road
and use it on laptops in a disconnected mode – even
without SAP software installed on that machine.

I had a customer ask me the other day if we are still committed to flash.  Well, considering Xcelsius 2008 was a complete rewrite into native Adobe Flex, I think we are pretty committed.  I hope that Apple and Adobe can get their differences sorted out.  I want my Xcelsius dashboards on my iPhone.  That said, Xcelsius is a flash-generator.  I’m sure the SAP engineers could quickly turn it into an HTML5 generator if they needed to.  Bottom line?  Your investment is safe.

And last but not least, [SAP NetWeaver] Business Warehouse
Accelerator appliance combines the flexibility of columnar
and inverted index databases with the speed of in-memory
database to provide a unique and powerful DBMS optimized
for BI.

As a BI Guy, I’ve never been all that interested in databases.  You plug them in and they work… but this new breed of analytic databases is a game changer.

Additionally, SAP leads the large vendor pack in self-
service BI SaaS offerings.

I keep wondering where this SaaS offering is going to go in the future.  There is huge potential behind it, but very few organizations seem to be doing it well.  Saleforce.com is the standout exception.  Considering crystalreports.com was launched in 2006, we’ve learned a lot since them.  Most organizations I work with want on premise solutions, but if you are a small business, you might want to have a look.  It’s very inexpensively month-to-month and considering the cloud integration of the Information Management solutions, it’s much easier to access corporate data in the cloud.

Best Is Yet To Come

… the best news of all?  They haven’t even seen BusinessObjects 4.0 yet!  Roll on December 2010!!

«Good BI»

Categories: In the News Tags: , ,

First Release of “Pioneer” for Microsoft Office

October 14th, 2010 No comments

If you are an SAP Customer who has been looking to see how long it will take SAP to fulfill their commitments to the roadmap, you now have your first installment.

SAP BusinessObjects Analysis, Edition for Microsoft Office

During all the roadmap presentations, the product was referred to as Pioneer, but it is now being released under the name: SAP BusinessObjects Analysis, edition for Microsoft Office.  (I was hoping for a slightly longer name myself).  What’s great about this product is that you can use it today.  It does NOT require an upgrade to your BusinessObjects Enterprise Infrastructure and it will not interfere with the use of LiveOffice.  It is a completely stand-alone install.

In some future release, I would expect this plug-in to become part of the larger LiveOffice Suite by SAP BusinessObjects.  You will notice that the name indicates that the solution is for Microsoft Office and that’s true.  You can also use the plug-in from within Powerpoint for example.

Advanced Analysis in Powerpoint

BEx and Excel

Excel has long been the primary delivery platform for SAP BW content.  My initial impression of this release was extremely positive.  The navigation panel is extremely intuitive and much easier to use than previous incarnations.  This product using the underlying BICS interface which means that the solution is extremely fast and there a promises of connectivity to Microsoft Analysis Services and Oracle Essbase in the future.

Some of the main highlights (besides a much easier to use tool) are:

  • Runs with all existing SAP BW Cubes and Queries
  • Native Support for BW  Authorizations
  • Native Support for Hierarchies, Multiple Hierarchies, Structures
  • Built-in predictive services
  • Support for “formula mode”

Let me talk about that last feature for a minute.

Formula Mode

You can convert all cells of a crosstab into formulas with one step. This deletes the crosstab object and defines every row in the table as a Microsoft Excel formula. The result values called from the server with the formula are still displayed in the table. The formula of the selected cell is displayed in the formula bar. In formula mode, you can edit the analysis table using Microsoft Excel formatting and formula functions and make further calculations using the existing data.

In formula mode, you can use all Microsoft Excel formatting functions. With the deletion of the design item, the individual formatting of the data will not be overwritten by the standard formatting in the crosstab the next time you update this data. This is great if you want to layout financial data in a specific way.  There are however a few restrictions when using this mode.

Converting to formula mode has the following consequences:

  • Navigation using Drag & Drop is no longer possible.
  • The context menu is not available.
  • The number format in the cells is set to standard.
  • You cannot switch back to analysis mode. To do this, you have to re-open the workbook.

Take A Look

If you have a significant investment in SAP BW, then you should definately have a look at this latest release.  For more information, I also suggest to look to the SAP Developer Network:
http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/boc/analysis

«Good BI»